Tag Archives: THC

Marijuana is NOT Safer than Alcohol

Skunk Alert: Marijuana is NOT Safer than Alcohol

Part 9 of a 9 part series

Unlike alcohol which consists of one chemical that is excreted from the body in a matter of hours, marijuana is fat-soluble, one half of which stays in the body and brain for a month, compounding with
each additional joint; longer than any other drug. It consists of 483 chemicals that turn into over
2,000 when smoked, and 61 cannabinoids all of which are bioactive and some are psychoactive.
The main psychoactive drug is THC (delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol). The THC content of marijuana has increased from ½ to 2% in the 60’s and 70’s to as high as 40% in smoked form, and 95% as wax or BHO (Butane Hemp Oil). While alcohol in moderation can even be beneficial, as with a glass or two of wine, today’s high potency pot, called Skunk, is primarily consumed just to get high, and with it are many serious harms to adolescent brains.Skunk About to Spray.svg.hi

Skunk is the name for today’s high potency marijuana.

See the first post in the series: Marijuana is Worse than Tobacco.

Cannabidiol is not Medical Marijuana

The Gupta/CNN special Weed 3 was not an accurate, balanced portrayal of marijuana. The intent to proliferate the perception of marijuana as a wonder drug was obvious, but unfortunate.

Cannabidiol (CBD), a component of the plant has helped some, like little 5- year old Charlotte, but it hasn’t been 100% effective and it’s not “medical marijuana,” implying it is the whole plant and medicinal. Constantly portraying it inaccurately speaks volumes for the true intent of the show.

We can all rejoice that some parents found relief for their child when conventional medicines failed. But surely these same parents would not wish their good fortune to be manipulated Continue reading Cannabidiol is not Medical Marijuana

Judge Mueller Upholds Schedule I Status

On April 15, 2015, Judge Kimberly Mueller of the US Court in Sacramento upheld the constitutionality of marijuana’s Schedule I designation.   Schedule I drugs are not deemed medically applicable and must have a high potential for abuse.

At the same time the judge decided not to dismiss the case against a dozen defendants of marijuana cultivation charges in a national forest.   It was an unprecedented situation to use criminal charges to try and pull off constitutional changes.  The status on that case is expected to be updated on May 6.

Judge Mueller’s ruling should not have been a surprise. It was a long shot to believe that a judge would single-handedly reverse the separation of powers built into the federal government,  overruling the legislative branch while usurping power from the executive branch.   The marijuana proponents had many testimonies on their behalf, while the federal government needed a single expert witness, Dr. Bertha Madras of Harvard University.

The last time the marijuana activists asked for a rescheduling was in 2012.  On January 22, 2013, a three-panel federal appeals court ruled against rescheduling marijuana. Judge Merrick Garland, now chief judge of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit, admitted that it was the court’s responsibility to defer to the scientific expertise of the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA).  The DEA had reached its conclusions with the input of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

While that earlier case questioned questioned whether the intentions of the DEA were arbitrary and capricious, the recent case questioned the intentions of Congress while setting down the 5-tier classification system back in 1970.

Schedule I drugs must have a high potential for abuse,  and are not deemed safe for medical application even under medical supervision.  The huge difficulty for confirming efficacy and proper dosing in “medical” marijuana substantiates this lack of safety.

Those asking for a rescheduling of marijuana claim that researchers don’t have the ability to study it.  However, there are currently 396 studies listed for clinical trials on derivatives of the marijuana plant, 273 for cannabidiol and 123 for THC.

Effects of Pot on the Young Brain

Recommended for educating school and community groups: In a 3-minute video, Crystal Dilworth explains how marijuana — even in small amounts — affects the developing brain, and changes its structure.  She makes a compelling case for why not to use for those under 25.

 

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