Category Archives: Violence

The Generational Curse of Marijuana

Family Disease of Addiction Unleashed by State Legalization

When a state legalizes drugs, it changes the culture dramatically and does incredible damage to the family system. Take the case of Ralph who believes he lost three nephews because of marijuana, and has completely lost touch with his sister, perhaps because of marijuana abuse by both her husband and daughter.

Ralph is 75 years old and moved out of the state of California once medical marijuana became legal. He witnessed crime skyrocketing, and pervasive drug use that he didn’t want his wife and children exposed to. “I didn’t want to live in a prison with bars on my windows.” He describes whole houses being robbed when people were away.  He saw motorcycle gang members doing drug pickups in his residential neighborhood and noticed people became afraid to walk outdoors in the once safe community.

The Curse of Marijuana on the Family System

The stories he tells of his nephews are chilling. His first brother Steven’s 15 year old son Tom was murdered, along with his 15 year old cousin Sarah in cold blood by a Mexican-American Vietnam Veteran. The two children were out bicycle riding in an orchard. The stranger killed them and stole their bicycles. He was a psychotic killer and later found to be responsible for the murders of at least 5 children. News reports describe him as a brutal rapist who had anger issues. Ralph is convinced he was a marijuana user which caused his mental health problems.

Steven’s other son, Samuel, started smoking marijuana in grade school and kept it up all through his teen years. His habit caught up with him when he lost a job as a welder after failing a drug test. Unemployed, he lost his home and his boat. Samuel drank himself to death in his early 40’s.

Employers won’t hire a marijuana user, because insurance companies won’t cover them – the risk is too great of an on the job accident. One of Ralph’s sons works for a large company in California as a manager and has a hard time finding prospective employees because few can pass the drug test.

His other brother, Craig had a son, Frank, who was 20 years old when his wife got him involved in marijuana. He began doing crimes, Ralph thinks, because of the influence of the drug. Frank involved his children in his crimes, hoisting his children through the windows of homes so they could open the door and he could break in to steal to support his drug habit. He even robbed a bank. He was put in prison and became a hardened criminal. Every time he was released from prison, he would do a crime because he wanted to go back. Frank called prison, “the only home I got.” Finally, he was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole. He died there at age 42.

Tragically, Frank’s son was also into drugs, starting with marijuana and ended up doing both cocaine and heroin. Ralph says his relatives told him the drugs “fried his brain.” Tired of living the way he was living, Frank’s son died ‘playing chicken’ with a diesel truck. He hit the truck head on going 60 miles per hour. Ralph believes he intended to commit suicide and that he was probably under the influence of the drug at the time.

As to Ralph’s sister, she married a heavy pot smoker. Their daughter is a heavy marijuana user. His sister has moved out of California and refuses to talk to her family. “She is just not herself anymore,” explains Ralph.

Thankfully, Ralph’s children were spared the fate of their cousins, perhaps because Ralph moved out of California to protect them from the drug culture.  Sadly, both of his brothers lost their only children to early death. Ralph lays the blame on the permissive drug culture in California.

Note:  The names of the persons in this story were changed to protect their identities.

Marijuana Use Expands Crime

A teen in Massachusetts smoked pot with another teen and then killed him.   Also last week, details emerged about a teen in Alaska who killed another teen over weed.   When there’s marijuana, crime happens

At the same time news came out about a man in West Virginia who sexually assaulted and killing the his girlfriend’s baby girl.  The couple smoked pot the evening before it happened.

Beginning Thursday, Massachusetts is poised to allow home grows of twelve plants which will service the black market for marijuana.    The state needs to prepare people and warn people of increase in this type of violence.

Certain people become highly delusional under the influence of marijuana, and have strange visions.  On November 25, a stoned driver had intense fear of a construction worker and ran over him with his vehicle.

If marijuana didn’t affect the brain, people would not hallucinate and kill so frequently under its influence..   Certain people stay in the state marijuana-induced psychosis for a very long time.

If the psychosis turns into schizophrenia, marijuana makes the condition worse.   A 19-year-old fraternity boy in Florida, who killed a couple in Florida, also started eating them.   THC was the only drug in his system and his father says there is schizophrenia in the family.
Also in Florida, the day after Thanksgiving, a babysitter got stoned and let the child drown.

Legalization Does Not Free the Police

We wonder why marijuana legalization advocates say: “Legalize to free police for more serious crimes.”   There are far too many stories showing that marijuana increases crime.

In Colorado, prosecutors have noticed an increase in murders motivated by marijuana, since legalization.

Humboldt County, California, principle pot-growing region of the USA, has a murder rate that far exceeds national averages.

On the first day of legalization in Washington state in 2012, two people were murdered when they tried to steal a marijuana grow.

Earlier this year,  murderers killed eight family members in southern Ohio, revealing a massive marijuana growing business.   

Since Massachusetts allows huge home grows, it probably won’t be long before police will be investigating such murders.  Obviously voters didn’t understand Question 4.  The marijuana advocates in Massachusetts are laughing right now.

Marijuana Use Leads to Domestic Violence Victims

Too many people are still deceived by the image of the laid back pot smoker.  A certain percentage of stoners can become psychotic and violent from using marijuana.   Davie Dauzat, who beheaded his wife on August 25, was certainly having a psychotic break when he killed her.  He told police that it was wrong, but he slayed her because it was a “battle between good and evil.”  He and his wife had smoked pot together before he killed her. 

Domestic Violence Awareness is promoted each year during the month of October.  Educating others about the connection between marijuana and psychosis can stop many irrational cases of unnecessary violence in the home.

Substance abusers cause more than 80 percent of domestic violence, according to estimates.   Some reports say drug and/or alcohol abuse is involved at least 92 percent of the time.  Marijuana, classified as a hallucinogen, can cause fear, anxiety, panic or paranoia. Experiencing any of these symptoms can lead to intimidating, violent or bullying behavior, endangering family, other people and property.

Last month Reveal and Cosmopolitan published riveting stories of sexual violence in marijuana country, the Emerald Triangle. If national policy targets early drug prevention, including marijuana, fewer men and women will become violent.

Domestic Violence and Marijuana Use

In South Carolina, Jesse Osborne recently shot and killed his father before attempting to murder three more people at an elementary school.  The father, Jeffrey Osborne, had convictions for marijuana and domestic abuse and had filed for bankruptcy.   The boy had acted out in previous years and had been forced out of the local school for bringing a hatchet.  Could it be that his violent, marijuana-using father was traumatizing him and he in turn acted out on others?

Marijuana use was a factor in two murder-suicides of young women by their current or former boyfriends last year.  Zachary Ham, 19-year-old boyfriend of Jasmine Hayslett,19, had been using marijuana since he was 13.  Their 20-month-old son survives. When Rebekah Eldermire’s ex-boyfriend shot her and turned the gun on himself, THC (the psychoactive component of marijuana) was the only drug in his system.

One of Stoppot’s big supporters was a 17 year-old California girl smoked pot to anesthetize the pain of losing her father.  By age 30, she was a mother and had been through a failed marriage and two boyfriends, each one a batterer who used pot. She had a failed suicide attempt at age 29.  Both she and her boyfriends used marijuana, but she failed to see how it was harming her life.  She continued to face depression and stayed in violent situations.  Badly beaten up and in the hospital, she had the revelation that marijuana was doing destroying her life.

Marijuana users are violent enough to kill their babies, too.  Recently, a man in Pennsylvania, killed his 5-month old daughter while high on marijuana.  Yet marijuana advocates try to tell us that marijuana is harmless.

Why Woman Stay With Partners Who Harm Them or Their Children

A University of Florida study gives insight into women who began using marijuana at a young age.  Frequent marijuana users in adolescence are twice as likely to engage in domestic violence as young adults.  The same study showed this group more than twice as likely to become a victim of domestic violence. 1  They often stay with intimate partners who are violent, even risking the safety of their children.

Consider the case of Wendy Salsbury, a mom whose boyfriend bashed her two-year-old’s head into the toilet and killed him.   The baby had tested + for THC at birth.  States with legal pot often don’t see marijuana as an issue of danger.  The father filed a $2.5 million dollar lawsuit against Oregon’s Department of Human Services.

Los Angeles paid $450,000 to the father of a dead child because the department of Children and Family Services failed to act on signs of child neglect and abuse. The boy died in early 2011. The mother tested positive for marijuana, but, as in other instances, it was a violent boyfriend who killed the two-year-old. 

Preventing girls from using marijuana at a young age may prevent them from hooking up with violent males.  National policy should address this issue and stop pretending that marijuana just makes users passive and lazy.   Highly addicted users, while high on the drug, may behave much like severe alcoholics, or even worse.

For addicted users who run out of the drug, there may be violence. A few weeks ago in Vermont, a 36-year-old man killed five people in a wrong-way driving crash. He had been convicted of domestic violence previously, and an ex-girlfriend said becomes violent when runs out of marijuana.  Earlier on the day of the accident, he had tried to check himself into an emergency medical center.

Solution to Domestic Violence

Studies from around the world have shown that marijuana contributes to psychosis and violence.  Efforts to stop domestic violence need to educate against substance abuse.   Multi-generational substance abuse and violence will continue until we change the way of dealing with these issues.

Much drug abuse comes from trauma.  We need to find solutions to childhood trauma that will circumvent drug use and not fall back on marijuana as a solution for PTSD. 2    Domestic Shelters need to take a holistic approach that helps the victims get away from drug use and into treatment.  Education is the big equalizer, but the national government continues to neglect the need for drug prevention programs in schools.  If states do not require it, domestic shelters should take up the slack, starting with the children.  Otherwise, the patterns will repeat.  Family courts have made costly mistakes by failing to see marijuana use as a serious issue.

Life is challenging, and substance abuse is not the way to deal with challenge.  If marijuana is promoted as safe and healthy, young people will not understand how marijuana usage interferes with responsible parenting.  Medical marijuana “patients” should reconsider their choice if they want to be in a relationship or continue parenting.  For people with physical handicaps, the law must carefully consider the children when considering their needs.

Footnotes:

1  A study The Journal of Interpersonal Violence, consistent marijuana use in adolescence is a strong predictor of intimate partner violence for those who are both victims and perpetrators, independent of alcohol use and other risk factors.  (Reingle, J. et.al., The Relationship Between Marijuana Use and Intimate Partner Violence in a Nationally Representative, Longitudinal Sample J Interpers Violence May 2012 27) These findings are consistent with prior studies, which have found that any marijuana use is predictive of victimization and physical assault by their intimate partners (Moore et al., 2008; Nabors, 2010; Railford et al., 2007).

2   Physically abused children are at special risk to become heavy pot users in adolescence.  See  Characteristics of Child Maltreatment and Adolescent marijuana Use: A Prospective Study, by Howard Dubowitz, Richard Thompson, Amelia M. Arria, Diana English, Richard Metzger and Jonathan Kotch, Child Maltreatment 

Marijuana, Mental Illness and Murder

By Roger Morgan, Take Back America Campaign (www.tbac.us)

 Sachs’s Trial Involves Another Murderer Linked to Marijuana

Pro-pot people like to say “nobody dies of marijuana.”   They are referring to overdose, of course, but overdose isn’t the only cause of death, nor the only adverse outcome.  Credible scientific research has clearly shown that marijuana is a causal factor in schizophrenia and paranoia, which in many cases has lead to violent acts of murder.  The riveting case of Californian Ashton Sachs in the news this week is a terrifying example.

Sachs was 19 years old, living in a condo his parents bought in Seattle.  Originally he attended college there, but dropped out of school in favor of smoking pot and playing video games. Then one day in February 2014 he drove 18 hours to San Juan Capistrano in Southern California and murdered his parents.  He also shot his younger brother in the head, and tried to kill his 17-year-old sister.  The brother is now paralyzed, and he happened to miss his sister because she hid under the sheets.

Then he flew back to Seattle, and arranged for his car to be shipped. He expressed awe and sorrow when being told about the death of his family members.  He even gave a heart-wrenching speech at the funeral.  Ultimately, he confessed and was sentenced on Friday to life in prison without possibility of parole.   He had a wide smile on his face in court, a symbol of his deranged, sociopathic mind.

How Marijuana Played a Role

Fortunately, not everyone who consumes cannabis goes crazy.  According to Dr. Christine Miller, a neuroscientist formerly with John Hopkins University, somewhere between 12 and 15% of users  will develop psychotic symptoms. (This statistic is for low-strength marijuana, while much marijuana today over 15% THC.)   Of those, about 35% develop full psychosis, of whom half become chronically mentally ill. The life-altering circumstances lead to homelessness, crime, public health expense and incredible pain and suffering for entire families. Too often it leads to suicide as well.

Those who use marijuana during adolescence are 7 times more likely to commit suicide.  (Ashton Sachs had already tried to take his own life twice) Heavy users of high-strength marijuana are 5 times more likely to develop schizophrenia at some point in their lives, often earlier rather than later.

In most cases of mass murders in recent history (Cascade Mall shooter, Tucson, Aurora, Colorado Springs, Boston Bombers, Orlando, etc), the murderer was a heavy pot user.  While correlation doesn’t equal causation, there are too many cases involving marijuana to deny marijuana’s impact on the brain as a factor.   It is not like these people were known for their heavy indulgence in sugar, milk or chocolate.

Read a previous article on the subject.