Category Archives: Hash Oil

Humboldt BHO Explosion Results in Murder Charges

Xavier Renner died from the butane hash oil fire that rocked Humboldt County the day after California’s vote to legalize.  That explosion happened in a Rio Dell   garage on November 9, 2016.  His friends, Aaron Mohr and Aaron Schisler, also had burns on 60 to 90 percent of their bodies.  The landlords and friends working with him have been charged with murder,  although Renner made the choice to experiment with making BHO,  The charges against the landlords who own the detached garage are  extreme.

California cannot control home chemists who make honey oil, also called BHO, the potent extract of marijuana with high THC.   Some people refer to BHO as “marijuana crack.” Continue reading Humboldt BHO Explosion Results in Murder Charges

Hash Oil Explosions Kill, Harm Neighbors

A hash oil explosion in North Portland on July 24, killed two men, annihilated a home and caused significant danger to the home next door.  While the man next door explained that his wife was shook up and his children at day camp, the family cat died in the fire.  The neighbor is lucky to be alive considering the extent of this explosion.

People use marijuana to make butane hash oil labs, also called honey oil.  These are the dangerous drug labs that are blowing up people and homes, particularly in California and in the West.

By April, 2015, the California Alliance of Drug-Endangered Children had tracked 41 marijuana lab deaths in that state between 2011 and 2015.   It’s not clear how many have happened since that time. Continue reading Hash Oil Explosions Kill, Harm Neighbors

Butane Hash Oil Fires Don’t End with Legalization

BHO Labs are a By-Product of Increased Access to the Drug

On November 9, 2016, in California, three men in Humboldt County celebrated their marijuana freedom by extracting BHO from marijuana. On the first day pot was 100% legal in California, their actions sparked a fire. Helicopters airlifted the injured men to UC Davis Hospital because their burns were so extensive.

A similar fire on January 14, 2017, totaled a home near Arcata in Humboldt County, injuring two people. It was the 4th fire in the county since legalization.

 

BHO or butane hash oil, which Californians call “honey oil” is a highly potent extract of the marijuana plant. Using highly flammable butane, amateurs extract the oil which can produce the strongest, most immediate high. Pot advocates claim that dangerous BHO fires are a by-product of “prohibition,” but they didn’t start happening until 2011, a good 15 years after so-called “medical” marijuana was legalized in 1996 by California. In 2009, medical marijuana dispensaries proliferated, and in 2010, the first BHO lab was discovered. By 2011, 8 illegal BHO labs were discovered, 3 of which exploded. In 2012, authorities uncovered 20 BHO labs, 16 of which had fires. In 2013, authorities found 68 BHO labs and 38 of them went up in flames. Nine people died from these BHO Labs in California that year.

In Washington, marijuana was legal — but not yet commercial – in 2013. A huge blast rocked an apartment complex in Bellevue. The BHO fire sparked huge flames and completely damaged two 12-unit apartment buildings. One hundred fire fighters and police spent 7 hours putting out the flames, in November, 2013. Neighbors jumped from the 2nd and 3rd floors. One elderly woman died from an injury sustained while fleeing from the fire.

The state did not take action, federal authorities needed to step in and establish that operating hash oil labs constituted reckless endangerment to human life. (Those responsible for the Bellevue fire and others convicted.) Today, both California and Colorado have laws making BHO manufacture in a residential setting a felony.

Worst Year for Fire and Death in 2014

In 2014, 32 people died in California from these explosions. In 2011, there were 5 explosions from butane extractions in California. The illegal practice grew until 2014, when 232 hash oil labs were discovered in California and 102 of them exploded. The state legislature then passed a law making the illegal manufacture of marijuana into hash oil a felony. If operating near a school or home with children, these crimes are now considered “aggravated felonies.”

BHO labs fired up Colorado in 2014, with 32 explosions that year. The marijuana advocates argued that Amendment 64 made home processing of BHO legal. Attorney General John Suthers disagreed, and the courts upheld that making BHO without a license is illegal. Yet, the explosions continue in Colorado.

People blow up cars, homes, apartments, and even hotels. Visitors to a motel near Sea World in San Diego were shocked to be forced out of their lodging because of an explosion in January, 2014.

In an explosion in Rancho Cordova, California in January 2014, 146 people in an apartment complex were displaced. In Walnut Creek, California, on Halloween, 2014, an entire 8-unit apartment building went up in flames and all residents were displaced. A fire in Redding, California that year also left multiple families homeless.

In 2015, there were at least five hash oil fires in Butte and Shasta Counties. Seven children and five adults were at home during one of these fires. In another huge fire in Redding in 2015, residents of 12 units were evacuated as a result of the massive explosion.

Click here to see KRCR TV coverage of a Shasta Apartment Fire

The Explosions Continue in Washington and Oregon

On October 18, a man running a hash oil lab in Bellingham suffered from severe burns. No one else was hurt, but the fire displaced four residents living in two units downstairs. It will take several months before the damages can be repaired.

On August 19, a man who caused a BHO fire in Spokane was so critically injured he was transported across the state to a Seattle hospital.

The fire near Seattle’s SeaTac airport last March 21st occurred in a house next door to a day care center. No children were there at the time, but it was a close call.

In Oregon, Gov. Kate Brown signed a law in 2016 making unlicensed production of marijuana extracts a felony. The bill was intended to target homemade butane hash oil setups. However, the fires are still taking place.

A butane operation caused a trailer fire in December in Springfield. In October, a blast rocked a legal marijuana business in Astoria. Two people were sent two people to Legacy Oregon Burn Center. A BHO-related explosion destroyed a Medford home last August.

The next time someone says that Prohibition causes these explosions, please recognize that this is propaganda not truth.

The Emerald Triangle, America’s Top Pot-Growing Region

Emerald-TriangleThe Emerald Triangle…A Devastating Scene

People who smoke pot may envy the power of the marijuana growers in the Emerald Triangle. Marijuana controls the economy in Humboldt, Trinity and Mendocino Counties of Northern California. Shasta County also has a huge marijuana industry, often hidden in its dense forests. Sometimes the police forces and local governments buy into the trade. But for residents who don’t use pot or drink or use other drugs, the growers and dealers are a major threat to safety and security.

Child abuse and neglect problems are rampant in this area which boasts that it supplies 60% of our nation’s marijuana supply. Many children grow up knowing that no one really cares about them. The violent child murders by marijuana grower Shane Miller is not so surprising in this area.  Last July Marijuana-wax user Matthew Graham, also from Shasta County died in a shootout with police, but he is suspected of killing his baby. It seems like each new case of child abuse is worse than the last, such as the recent discovery in Eureka of two children who died in a storage unit.

The state legislature is afraid to put teeth in any legislation to control the marijuana growers, and right now the Federal Government is providing no funds to go after medical marijuana providers, although so many of these providers cross the line into drug dealing (most of the medical marijuana industry in California).

People who grow marijuana or who have lots of marijuana can make the most money, so the fight for control of this money drives the crime. Here’s news from the Humboldt County Sheriff Department’s about a recent hash oil explosion in Eureka and how it effects other people.

In addition to hash oil explosions, there are many home invasions such as the one that happened on the night of February 28, 2016 in Weitchpec. Welcome to the world of marijuana.

“Victims told deputies at about 9:30 p.m. three males, one armed with a pistol and two with shotguns, entered their residence. The suspects were wearing jackets with Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office emblems. The suspects tied up the victims with zip ties and the suspects demanded marijuana, cash, and guns. The three suspects stole cash and a 2014 white Toyota Tundra pick-up truck prior to leaving the scene.”

Here’s some charts to show a comparison of the crime rate in Humboldt County compared to the rest of the country.

Recently, Time Magazine listed Redding (population about 90,000) in Shasta County as one of the worst places in the country for its growing crime rate:

“There were 1,298 violent crimes in the Redding metro area in 2012, up from 851 violent crimes in 2007. On a standardized, per 100,000 resident basis, violent crime rose more than 53% in that time. Additionally, property crimes rose by more than 50%, the most of any metro area reviewed, despite a nationwide 12.7% decline in such crimes during that time. According to the Redding Record Searchlight, some area residents believe that the area’s high crime rates may be related to marijuana cultivation. Officials in Shasta County — which makes up the Redding metro area — recently elected to ban outdoor growing, although the city of Redding is not included in the ban.”

The Emerald Triangle provides insight into what will happen if the marijuana groups get to control of California and the rest of the United States and Canada.