Category Archives: Testimonies

Homeless Man’s View of Marijuana’s Curse

The real cost of marijuana legalization: Homelessness and trouble finding work.

Marijuana legalization is causing the homeless population in Pueblo, Colorado to rise. This video is a first-hand account of a young homeless man who was diagnosed with anxiety and depression disorder after starting to smoke marijuana at the age of 15. Devin was introduced to marijuana after his grandmother gave his mother (her daughter) the drug to combat chronic pain. The two started using the drug together and after moving to Colorado became homeless and are struggling to find work.

This story is a dramatic example of multi-generational drug use and how some of these conditions run within the family.

Watch the video here:

For more stories about marijuana addiction visit:  http://www.poppot.org/

For another story that deals with multi-generational drug use visit: http://www.stoppot.org/2017/06/15/generational-curse-marijuana/

Calaveras County Suffering with Illegal Pot Grows

My name is Bill McManus and I have been battling pot in Calaveras County for over three years.  I am a ZERO TOLERANCE activist to rid our county of all commercial cultivation of pot.  I know we have to deal with PROP 64 (California’s Recreational Pot Initiative which passed 11/16), but even that law allows for banning outdoor grows based on a county’s jurisdiction to regulate land use.

(Please join those trying to Save Calaveras County.     Here is a previous article on the problems and the crime.)

I have seen this criminal enterprise up close and personal.  Hundreds, if not thousands of residents are considering leaving our county because of the abuse of the pot cartels.  I myself have been assaulted twice and had both of my vehicles vandalized.  One thing is crystal clear, if you allow any of it, you get all of it and according to the latest info from Central Valley HIDTA, Calaveras county is rivaling the Emerald Triangle for illegal pot production.

Crime Went Way Up!

In the last two years, crime has gone up 400%.  The District Attorney is handling 18 marijuana-related murders in our county, a county with only 45,000 residents!  

negatives-marijuana-legalizationOur small county has somewhere between 1500 and 2000 illegal grows.  We have had human trafficking problems, illegal timber harvests, illegal grading, illegal stream diversions, water theft, destroyed rural roads from water trucks hauling stolen water out to pot grows, one family in the Federal Witness Protection Program because the husband serviced porta potties at a pot grow………the list goes on and on.

If you want to see the ugly side of the pot cartels, give me a call. I will show you what is going on and introduce you to people who are afraid to leave their homes because of nearby pot grows.  Identified cartels in this county include, Hmongs, Motorcycle gangs from the valley, Mexican mafia, Russian mafia, Jamaican Cartels, Asian cartels, and refugee cartels from the Emerald Triangle.  BAN it, BAN it all.  If even one hair’s breadth of opening is given to them, you will LOSE the battle, your lifestyles, your security in your home, and all sense of community.

Grab a flak vest and come visit Calaveras County. By the way, county Code Compliance officials are not allowed to enter any pot grow without a sheriff escort……what about the citizens who remain behind after the inspections?

Check out our website www.bancommercialcultivation.com

Bill McManus, Chair – The Committee to Ban Commercial Cultivation

PS: don’t contact me regarding compromise……the IS the hill I will die on.   Join the team on our Facebook page: Ban Commercial Cultivation

The Generational Curse of Marijuana

Family Disease of Addiction Unleashed by State Legalization

When a state legalizes drugs, it changes the culture dramatically and does incredible damage to the family system. Take the case of Ralph who believes he lost three nephews because of marijuana, and has completely lost touch with his sister, perhaps because of marijuana abuse by both her husband and daughter.

Ralph is 75 years old and moved out of the state of California once medical marijuana became legal. He witnessed crime skyrocketing, and pervasive drug use that he didn’t want his wife and children exposed to. “I didn’t want to live in a prison with bars on my windows.” He describes whole houses being robbed when people were away.  He saw motorcycle gang members doing drug pickups in his residential neighborhood and noticed people became afraid to walk outdoors in the once safe community.

The Curse of Marijuana on the Family System

The stories he tells of his nephews are chilling. His first brother Steven’s 15 year old son Tom was murdered, along with his 15 year old cousin Sarah in cold blood by a Mexican-American Vietnam Veteran. The two children were out bicycle riding in an orchard. The stranger killed them and stole their bicycles. He was a psychotic killer and later found to be responsible for the murders of at least 5 children. News reports describe him as a brutal rapist who had anger issues. Ralph is convinced he was a marijuana user which caused his mental health problems.

Steven’s other son, Samuel, started smoking marijuana in grade school and kept it up all through his teen years. His habit caught up with him when he lost a job as a welder after failing a drug test. Unemployed, he lost his home and his boat. Samuel drank himself to death in his early 40’s.

Employers won’t hire a marijuana user, because insurance companies won’t cover them – the risk is too great of an on the job accident. One of Ralph’s sons works for a large company in California as a manager and has a hard time finding prospective employees because few can pass the drug test.

His other brother, Craig had a son, Frank, who was 20 years old when his wife got him involved in marijuana. He began doing crimes, Ralph thinks, because of the influence of the drug. Frank involved his children in his crimes, hoisting his children through the windows of homes so they could open the door and he could break in to steal to support his drug habit. He even robbed a bank. He was put in prison and became a hardened criminal. Every time he was released from prison, he would do a crime because he wanted to go back. Frank called prison, “the only home I got.” Finally, he was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole. He died there at age 42.

Tragically, Frank’s son was also into drugs, starting with marijuana and ended up doing both cocaine and heroin. Ralph says his relatives told him the drugs “fried his brain.” Tired of living the way he was living, Frank’s son died ‘playing chicken’ with a diesel truck. He hit the truck head on going 60 miles per hour. Ralph believes he intended to commit suicide and that he was probably under the influence of the drug at the time.

As to Ralph’s sister, she married a heavy pot smoker. Their daughter is a heavy marijuana user. His sister has moved out of California and refuses to talk to her family. “She is just not herself anymore,” explains Ralph.

Thankfully, Ralph’s children were spared the fate of their cousins, perhaps because Ralph moved out of California to protect them from the drug culture.  Sadly, both of his brothers lost their only children to early death. Ralph lays the blame on the permissive drug culture in California.

Note:  The names of the persons in this story were changed to protect their identities.

Maryland’s Senators Introduce Marijuana Legislation

The Proliferating Pot Problem in Maryland

On March 3rd, 2017 Senators in Annapolis gathered to introduce two new bills that would call for the legalization of marijuana in Maryland.  The two new bills are being introduced by Democratic Senator Brian Feldman as well as Democratic Senator Richard Madaleno Jr, both from Montgomery County.

Feldman’s bill calls for the citizens of Maryland 21 and over to be able to purchase legal cannabis,  possess up to two ounces of marijuana at one time, and cultivate up to six plants at one time with three of those plants being mature each cycle.

Madaleno’s bill calls for the legalization of marijuana where users will be able to possess up to one ounce or less of dried cannabis, 5 grams of hash oil and 72 ounces of cannabis creams or oils, or any combination of the above.

An experienced marijuana grower can yield up to 5.0 oz per plant when subjected to the right conditions which is absolutely absurd. How many plants do people really need to be growing in their houses?

Marijuana was decriminalized in Maryland back in 2014 and now Senators and delegates are revisiting the issue of making it legal for all citizens over the age of 21.

During the committee hearing many different people showed up to voice their opinion to the proposed legislation. One such person was Aubree Adams, who traveled all the way from Pueblo, Colorado to share her heartbreaking story.

As she got up on the stand to present her testimony she asked for more than the two allocated minutes to speak to which her appeal was rejected, so she began to speak very fast in order to get through her pitch. The committee realized that this was going to get them nowhere so they granted her additional time.

She began talking about  the negative adaptations Pueblo has had to make over years since marijuana has been legal, hitting on the fact that the homeless rate has skyrocketed as well as the crime rate since Amendment 64’s inception in 2012.

Adams’s story turns a corner when she begins talking about her own son and how his addiction to marijuana edibles had triggered psychotic episodes and an attempt at suicide. His addiction developed after proposition 64 passed and access to edible marijuana became extremely easy in Pueblo.

One night while suffering from a marijuana induced psychosis episode Adams’ son attacked his younger brother and put a gun to his own head, but did not pull the trigger. Instead he decided to overdose on 250 ibuprofen pills. “He vomited all night in his sleep,” Adams said. Her oldest son is now part of a treatment community and resides in Houston, Texas.

Other testimonies came from Dr. Amelia Arria, who is the Director of the Center on Young Adult Health and Development and the Office of Planning and Evaluation at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, and Dr. Peter Musser who is a clinical psychologist who received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Dr. Arria, who has researched marijuana for over 25 years concludes that, “Cannabis use is linked with decreased productivity and decreased cognitive function.”

Dr. Musser similarly has seen in his research that the more normalized marijuana becomes in the communities, the amount of people who go to the ER for psychosis had increased. Dr. Musser also mentions that treatment centers in Colorado have been adding more beds and expanding in order to keep up with the influx of new patients. Shouldn’t our government be trying to stop the problem, not try to avoid the issue by just putting up with it? These two bills would also cost Maryland taxpayers around $2.1 million to implement. These two issues will be on the ballot for voters to decide later on in 2018.

Click Here to view the Senate Committee Hearing